Melvin the Frog

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2018-05-05 18.53.39

Melvin the Frog is a sculpture by Gary Lee Price, sculptures by Gary are regularly seen all over Springville and other places.  Growing up in Mapleton/Springville I remember seeing Melvin on a post here on 1200 South for many years and he just showed up here in front of Duke’s Jewelers on Springville Main Street.  I’ve seen him a few other places too.

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Utah Power – Southeast Substation

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2018-03-03 10.57.08

Utah Power – Southeast Substation

In 2004 Utah Power expanded the Southeast substation and the three houses shown below were removed.  These homes were constructed by Kimball & Richards Building Company as part of the Highland Park Subdivision at a time when the population of Salt Lake City was approximately 93,000.

By 2004, the Salt Lake City population had increased to nearly 179,000, increasing the demand for electricity and necessitating the expansion of the Southeast substation.  Prior to their removal, members of the Sugarhouse community were invited to salvage items from the bungalows such as bricks, doors, windows, moldings, flooring, light fixtures, etc.

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Utah Light & Railway Company

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2018-03-03 11.00.33

Utah Light & Railway Company

In 1911, Utah Light and Railway Company constructed this power distribution substation on the present site.  The building was the finest of its kind for the times and cost in excess of $20,000.00.

The southeast substation became one of six distribution transformer stations in the Utah Light and Railway (later Utah Light and Traction Company) power system, all of which were leased in 1915 to Utah Power and Light Company, which had been organized three years earlier for the purpose of consolidating the numerous small independent electric companies then operating in Utah.   Utah Power and Light Company subsequently utilized the southeast substation as the tie-in point at which the system of Provo-based Knight Consolidated Power Company was integrated with that of Utah Light and traction Company.

The southeast substation by the 1930’s was the largest such facility in the Utah Light and traction portion of Utah Power and Light’s distribution system.

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Seven Magic Mountains

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Seven Magic Mountains

Almost like a fluorescent Stonehenge in the desert near Jean, Nevada (South of Las Vegas along Interstate 15),  Seven Magic Mountains is a Land Art installation that draws many for photo opportunities.

“Seven Magic Mountains is an artwork of thresholds and crossings, of balanced marvels and excessive colors, of casting and gathering and the contrary air between the desert and the city lights.” – Ugo Rondinone

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Hotel Plandome

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2018-01-13 14.18.49

Hotel Plandome

The elaborate flower details on its molded cornice and lion heads peering from atop its pilasters give the Federation of Labor Hall a fanciful feel.  Local brewer Albert Fisher constructed this building in 1903 to house the Utah Federation of Labor and its associated unions.  The second and third floors of the building originally featured lodge rooms and a spacious auditorium.  In 1913, Fisher decided to remodel the building as a hotel.  The north side of the building still bears a painted sign for the Hotel Plandome.  The hotel’s “specialty of serving breakfast for the convenience of its guests” was advertised as a “European” attraction.

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Converse Hall

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2018-01-13 13.12.51

Converse Hall

Although the origins of Westminster College date back to the establishment of the Salt Lake Collegiate Institute on April 12, 1875, Converse Hall, constructed in 1906, was the first building erected on the campus of Westminster College. The building was designed by architect Walter E. Ware and named for John Converse, president of the Baldwin Locomotive Works in Philadelphia, who donated 20,000 dollars of the 27,000 dollar costs of the building. As the first building on campus, it served many functions including the boys dormitory, administration offices, assembly hall, chemistry lab, lecture hall, classrooms and library. It currently houses administrative and faculty offices, classrooms and a lounge theater.

It is one of the oldest and central buildings on the campus of Westminster College in Sugar House.

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Westminster College

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2018-01-13 13.12.51

Westminster College

The school was founded in 1875 as the Salt Lake Collegiate Institute, a prep school under the supervision of the First Presbyterian Church of Salt Lake City.  The church’s first building was the college until the congregation grew to 500 members and that building was moved (see this page).

The college changed its name to “Westminster College” in 1902 to better reflect a more general Protestant education. The name is derived from the Westminster Confession of Faith, a Presbyterian confession of faith, which, in turn, was named for the district of London where it was devised. The University of Westminster, London is a separate higher education institution in the United Kingdom and is not affiliated with Westminster College.

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Jeppa and Anna Nelson Granary

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Jeppa and Anna Nelson Granary

Built c 1874 at 200 W. 100 N. over what is thought to be their original rock-lined dugout. This granary is representative of many granaries built by all Pleasant Grove farmers for grain storage. Root vegetables and apples were stored in cellars, some of which were originally dugouts. Jeppa liberally shared his harvest with those in need. The granary was moved from the Leon Hatch property to the present site March 2, 1993.

Jeppa and Anna Nelson arrived in Pleasant Grove in 1873. ‘They lived in a dugout until spring when a one room house was built:’ “I remember the old cellar on the farm when I was a child, and Dad told us this was his first home.” (History of Swen John Nelson written by his daughter, Zelda Nelson Freeman.)

In addition to Jeppa’s regular granary, this smaller one, thought to be the one-room house built over his original house, a dugout, was set right by the street. One day a fellow Scandanavian commented, ” Bro. Nelson, that is a poor place to have a granary, and besides you are liable to have your grain stolen.” Jeppa replied, “the purpose of putting the granary there and having it unlocked is so people who need the grain may take it with no embarrassment. They are welcome to it.” The friend concluded, “now that is what I call a trusting good man.” (Memories of Grandpa and Grandma Nelson, by Zelda Freeman.)

Years after the Nelson family arrived in Pleasant Grove, Jeppa looked back and wrote of his settlement here.

And as fast as I was somewhat acquainted I received work. But there was no money to be had, but I earned wheat and other things which I could use in the family. I could do many different kinds of work and I took on anything they wanted me to do. I rented a couple of rooms until I had dug out a basement (dugout). I bought 10 acres of land, and in between working for other people, I dug the dugout, and lined it with brick and rock inside. So I had a good room ready at Christmas so I could move in – Then I went around during the winter and did some slaughtering, made wooden shoes, went to the mountains for timber for a chicken coop. I had no timber the first year. I didn’t have much of my land tilled, but worked for others most of the time – then I bought a pair of oxen, an old wagon, and 10 acres more land and leased 5 acres. Then it started to go well for me in working on the land, and I harvested wheat and potatoes and lucerne, and I bought until I had 30 acres. Then I had all I could do to take care of it…” (Journal of Jeppa Nelson)

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This is located in Pioneer Park in Pleasant Grove, Utah.