Desert Star Theater

Desert Star Theater

(*)Desert Star Theater is a dinner theater establishment in Murray, Utah. It started out as a small theater called the Gem, which showed silent movies with a piano for music. It was later closed down and demolished, but rebuilt and expanded into the Iris Theater by owner Tony Duvall. After his retirement, the Iris changed hands several times before being renamed the Vista.

The National Register of Historic Places, notes Iris Theater, Apartments and Commercial Building, built in 1930, is significant for its role in the urbanization of Murray City. With its combination of entertainment, retail, and residential space, the building represents an elaborate example of the multi-use commercial block common during the early twentieth-century development of the city’s commercial business district. The building was owned by the Duvall family who managed the theater while living in the apartments above the storefronts. The Iris building is also significant as the only commercial building in Murray built in the Art Deco style. Though not a particularly ornate example of the style, the building makes a distinctive contribution to the State Street frontage of the Murray Downtown Historic District. The building is in good condition and is a contributing historic resource of the city.

Arrowhead Trail 1914-1924

Arrowhead Trail 1914-1924

Las Vegas promoters claimed to be the originators of this all-weather route between Los Angeles and Salt Lake City. From the beginning, the Arrowhead Trail was a “grass roots” effort, including promotion by the various Chambers of Commerce and volunteer construction by local citizens. However, it was Charles H. Bigelow, from Los Angeles, who gave the trail publicity. During 1915 and 1916 he drove the entire route many times in his Twin-Six Packard he named “Cactus Kate.”

The trail, which extends near here, was built in 1915 and completed the section between St. Thomas and Las Vegas. In its day it denoted a milestone of progress.

Nevada State Historic Marker #168

Nevada’s First State Park

Nevada’s First State Park

This park, situated on the old Arrowhead Trail, was designated on March 26, 1935 as Boulder Dam-Valley of Fire State Park.

Though four state parks were established by concurrent legislation, Valley of Fire is considered Nevada’s first State Park as it was dedicated prematurely on Easter Sunday, 1934.

Thomas W. Miller of Reno (Overton-Caliente) led the move to establish Nevada’s State Park System. He was appointed in 1935 as the first Park Commission Chairman.

Recognized nationally for its outstanding scenic, geologic, and archeological features, 8,760 acres were patented to the State in 1931 as a State Exchange Grant.

Civilian Conservation Corp companies initiated park development in 1933.

Nevada State Historic Marker #150

The Journey of the Dead Man

The Journey of the Dead Man

Early Spanish traders named the fifty-five dry miles separating Las Vegas and the Muddy River the Jornada del Muerto (Journey of the Dead Man). The longest stretch without water along the Old Spanish Trail was littered with the skeletons of animals and parts of wagons abandoned along the sandy desert. Most experienced travelers made the trip at night.

John C. Fremont crossed the Jornada in 1844 and commented: “We ate the barrel cactus and moistened our mouths with the acid if the sour dock. Hourly expecting to find water, we continued to press on to midnight, when after a hard and uninterrupted march of 16 hours, our wild mules began running ahead; and in a mile or two we came to a bold running stream (the Muddy River).”

Nevada State Historic Marker #139

Delta Center, Salt Lake Ice Center, EnergySolutions Arena, Vivint Smart Home Arena

Delta Center, Salt Lake Ice Center, EnergySolutions Arena, Vivint Smart Home Arena

Opened in 1991, this popular Utah arena was known as the Delta Center, under a naming rights deal with Delta Air Lines, which has a hub at Salt Lake City International Airport. Salt Lake City-based EnergySolutions purchased the naming rights in November 2006, after Delta decided not to renew their 15-year contract due to filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy the year prior. From 2006 to 2015, it was known as EnergySolutions Arena. On October 26, 2015, the arena was renamed as part of a 10-year naming rights contract with the Provo-based home security system provider Vivint.

John Ashworth House (155 S. 200 West)

John Ashworth House (155 S. 200 West)

The John Ashworth House at 115 S. 200 West in Beaver, Utah was built in 1875. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983. The listing include four contributing buildings.

It was built for John Ashworth, who was born in England and who was the first manager-superintendent of the Beaver Woolen Mills, and who also served as Beaver’s second mayor, during 1880-82.

It was deemed “significant because it is an interesting combination of two of the most popular house types in Beaver during the 1875-1890 period, namely, the Hall & Parlor (north section) and the Cross-wing (south section) types. This marriage of house designs produces an interesting effect, for while the house is perfectly consistent with house planning principles found during this period of Beaver’s history, it also becomes at once a house which is both common (the Hall & Parlor house with rear extension) and rare (the double cross-wing or H-plan). For a further discussion of the double cross-wing house in Utah, see the nomination form for the Charles E. Davies house, Provo, Utah (National Register listing January 1983).”

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John Ashworth House (110 S. 100 West)

John Ashworth House (110 S. 100 West)

The John Ashworth House at 1105 S. 1st West in Beaver, Utah is a historic house. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983.

It is a hall and parlor plan house with a shed extension to the rear, built in 1880. It was built by John Ashworth, then mayor of Beaver, probably for William Ashworth, one of his sons. John Ashworth lived in the large house to the east on the same block, the John Ashworth House (200 West, Beaver, Utah), also NRHP-listed.

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