252 Canyon Road

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This one and one-half story house follows the French Second Empire style with eclectic variants. It has a mansard roof and two gabled dormer per side. It has a wide frieze with brackets. The Roman arched window bays with transom filled in. The architecture is similar to a style of houses in Ogden and Brigham City. There is an usually wide open wall area between the first and second windows. It is significant because it is an example of the Second Empire architecture.

It is hard to tell the original exterior wall treatment and the windows have phony shutters. The house is worthy of restoration.

This 1880 house is one of the best examples of French Second Empire architecture in Salt Lake. Helaman Pratt, the original owner, was a colonizer in several areas in the West. Later the house belonged to Franklin Richard Snow, a leading Salt Lake businessman.

This was one of the first homes in the City Creek area. It was built before Canyon Road came through so it faced downtown rather than on to a road like the rest of the houses.

Helaman Pratt, the original owner of this house, was born in Mt. Pisgah in 1847 as the Mormons were crossing the plains. He helped settle the Muddy River mission in Arizona and the Sevier area. He served two missions to Mexico, one in 1875 and one in 1883. He was made president of the mission in 1884. Pratt spent the rest of his life after there as a leader of the LDS Church in the Mormon colonies in Mexico.

Pratt acquired the property in City Creek in 1880 from Joseph L. Kinsburg who ran a mill in the area. Pratt lived in the house from 1880 until he went on his mission in 1883.

In the early 1890’s Pratt agreed to sell the house to Franklin Richard Snow, a son of Erastus and Artimesia Beman Snow. Snow had also served a mission to Mexico in 1883 and he might have met Pratt there.

Located at 252 Canyon Road in the City Creek Canyon Historic District of Salt Lake City, Utah.

211 Canyon Road

This one and one half story frame house is brick on the first level and frame on the second. It is a house pattern style with modest Victorian influences. There are fish scale shingles on the gable ends and dormers. The roof is gabled with hipped dormers.

Elliot Kimball worked for Union Pacific Railroad. The house, which was built in 1904 is typical of the house pattern plans that were used during that period of time in Salt Lake.

Kimball, a son of John Henry and Margaret Clayton Kimball was born in Salt Lake City. He was a grandson of William Clayton and a great-grandson of Heber C. Kimball, both Utah pioneers and church leaders.

Kimball was a member of the First Volunteer Cavalry during the Spanish American War. In 1900, he started work as a brakeman with Union Pacific. He also worked as a messenger for the Pacific Exposition Company and in real estate.

Located at 211 Canyon Road in the City Creek Canyon Historic District of Salt Lake City, Utah.

The Utter Disaster

The Utter Disaster

On September 9 & 10, the Utter Wagon Train engaged in a life-and-death struggle with attacking Indians.

The assault on the wagon train of forty-four emigrants led by Elijah P. Utter just north of here resulted in the death of six men, two women, and three children. Indian casualties were estimated at between 25 and 30. Survivors followed the Snake River to near the mouth of the Owyhee River. When rescued by the Army 45 days later, only fifteen had survived the ordeal of hunger and deprivation. No other Oregon Trail wagon train suffered greater losses.

This is Idaho Historic Marker #493 located near Murphy, Idaho

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War Eagle Mines

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War Eagle Mines

For decades after 1884, most of Silver City’s fabulous mineral wealth came from Upper War Eagle Mountain, which rises a vertical mile above here.

With lodes far richer than those found elsewhere, War Eagle miners fought a series of violent wars for control of valuable claims. Troops from Fort Boise finally had to intervene in one-armed clash in 1868. San Francisco bank failures ended production there in 1875 and thriving camps became ghost towns.

This is Idaho Historic Marker #380 located near Murphy, Idaho

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Diamond Gulch

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Diamond Gulch

In December, 1865, Idaho’s Governor — Caleb Lyon of Lyonsdale — set off a wild rush to Diamond Gulch, visible a few miles west of here, with as story that was to good to be true.

He told miners in Silver City that a prospector had given him some priceless diamonds from that area. Enough gems of interest to rockhounds were found there to maintain a diamond frenzy that winter. A similar excitement followed in 1892, but no actual diamonds ever were recovered in Diamond Gulch.

This is Idaho Historic Marker #454 located near Murphy, Idaho

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