205 East Vine Street

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2018-07-02 19.01.14

205 East Vine Street

This one-and-a-half story Victorian Eclectic style house was constructed in circa 1895 by James Perry Freeze.  Freeze was an early LDS pioneer and active in local business, church, and civic affairs.  He purchased 184 acres in 1811 for $7,800 and likely built this house for his second wife, Sarah Jane Granter.  Her son, Sherman G. Freeze, sold the City of Murray some of the land which later became Murray City Park.  Character-defining architectural features of the home include its hip-roofed dormers, dentil stringcourse rock-faced brick at top of window openings and above the foundation, coursed rock-faced sandstone foundation, leaded and transom windows, and shingle-sided dormers.  The home is a key contributor to the Murray Downtown Historic District.

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Salt Lake Stock & Mining Exchange

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2018-06-16 15.22.02

Salt Lake Stock & Mining Exchange

The Salt Lake Stock and Mining Exchange was the outgrowth of the rapid development of Utah’s mining industry during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. Organized in 1888 to provide mine developers the opportunity to offer shares in their properties to the public and to raise the necessary capital to carry out development work the stock exchange played an important role in the growth of Utah’s economy.

In 1899 the Exchange, located at 18 West 200 South was incorporated by J. E. Jackson, E. H. Airis, D. H, Petery Jr., Timothy Egan, William H. Tibbals, R. L. Colburn, M. S. Pendergast, Ben D. Luce and Herman Bamberger. The Exchange continued to serve an important role in the economic life of Utah and in 1908 Samuel Newhouse donated property at 39 Exchange Place for a stock exchange building, Samuel Newhouse came to Salt Lake City in 1896 when he acquired the Highland Boy mine (now part of the Kennecott Copper Mine, a National Historic Landmark). Newhouse developed a strong commitment to his adopted home and worked diligently to make Salt Lake City the business and financial center of the West. He erected Utah’s first skyscrapers, the Newhouse and Boston Buildings, on the west end of Exchange Place, constructed a hotel on Fourth South and Main just across the street from the Newhouse Building, donated land for the Commercial Club Building also on Exchange Place, planned for the construction of a theater across the street from the Stock Exchange Building, and two business buildings which would compliment the Boston and Newhouse Buildings and be located on the east end of Exchange Place. The Salt Lake Stock and Mining Exchange Building located in the center of Exchange Place was to be the heart of the complex. Unfortunately, Samuel Newhouse overextended himself and investments in unsound mining ventures led to his demise.

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607 Second Avenue

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2018-01-13 15.55.52

607 Second Avenue

This Georgian Revival style home was designed by Alberto O. Treganza of the noted Salt Lake City architectural firm, Ware and Treganza.  The home was buit c. 1906 for A.C. Ellis, Jr., an attorney who specialized in mining matters.  Ellis later became a U.S. District Court Judge in Utah and eventually a United States Supreme Court Judge (1913).  Ellis lived in this house until his death in 1941.

For other historic homes in the Salt Lake City Avenues visit this page.

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77 J Street

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77 J Street

This Victorian house was built c. 1875 by prominent building contractor William J. Tuddenham who later constructed the Hotel Utah. It was built for George W. Reed, one of the first business managers of the Deseret News and one of the earliest owners of the Salt Lake Tribune. Mr. Reed died in 1909 at his home after being hit by an automobile. The property passed to his children and remained in the family until 1982.

For other historic homes in the Salt Lake City Avenues visit this page.