Panaca

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Panaca

Southern Nevada’s first permanent settlement was established as a Mormon colony by Francis C. Lee and others in 1864. Poor in resources, but rich in people, Panaca has changed little through the years. Although mining at nearby Bullionville and Pioche has had its effect, Panaca remains an agricultural community.

The post office was established in 1867, moved to Bullionville in 1874, and returned in 1879. During the 1870s, coke ovens produced charcoal here for the smelters at Bullionville.

Originally located in Washington County, Utah, Panaca became part of Nevada by an act of Congress, dated May 5, 1866. As the boundary was not then surveyed, a dispute arose over taxes levied by Lincoln County, Nevada. The matter settled in favor of the Panaca citizenry on December 4, 1871, after a long period of bitter litigation.

This is Nevada State Historical Marker #39, located in front of the post office at 1046 East Main Street in Panaca, Nevada.

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Panaca Ward Chapel

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Panaca Ward Chapel

One of the oldest buildings in Lincoln County, the Panaca Ward Chapel was constructed of adobe from the swamps west of town in 1867-1868.

Built as a Mormon chapel, the building was also used as a school and recreation hall. The chapel is typical of the development in small Mormon pioneer communities in the intermountain West during the mid-1800s.

This is Nevada State Historical Marker #182, located on the Bishops’ Storehouse behind the chapel at 1065 East Main Street in Panaca, Nevada.

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Patsy Vario Jr. Memorial

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Patsy Vario Jr.
June 25, 1924 – Dec. 19, 1944
Died in Milne Bay, New Guinea Served in the South-East Asian Theatre WW II
U. S. ARMY
Pat Vario & Don Haslem were high school buddies when war broke out. Both joined the U.S. Army to serve their nation on the “Buddy Team Enlistment Program” Both enjoyed life giving the ultimate sacrifice and died side by side together.
Our thanks to Bob Walraven who also served with Pat and Don.
Patsy had three brothers who served in WW II
Anthony, Frank & Ernest

This memorial is in Ophir, Utah

Miles Goodyear Cabin

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Miles Goodyear Cabin

This cabin, built about 1841 by Miles Goodyear, as far as known the first permanent house built in Utah, stood near the junction of the Ogden and Weber Rivers. In 1848 it was sold to Captain James Brown of the Mormon Battalion with a Spanish land grant covering all of Weber County. It was preserved by Minerva Stone Shaw and by her presented to the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, Weber County Chapter, who placed it on its present site.

This is Utah Pioneers Trails and Landmarks Association historic marker #41, later adopted by the Sons of Utah Pioneers. Erected July 24, 1934 and located at the Weber County Daughters of Utah Pioneers Museum at 2104 Lincoln Avenue in Ogden, Utah

Lorin Farr

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Lorin Farr
1820-1909
Pioneer-Religious and Civic Leader-Statesman

Lorin Farr was a Utah pioneer of 1847. He was a friend and staunch supporter of Joseph Smith, the Prophet, and assisted in the settlement of Nauvoo, Ill. Where he helped build the temple.

He was the first president of Weber Stake of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, a member of the first Territorial Legislature and a member of the the convention that framed the constitution of the State of Utah. He assisted in laying out the original plat of the city of Ogden, organized the first city government and became its first mayor.

He build and operated the first grist mill and saw mill in Weber County and, with others, constructed the first highway through Ogden Canyon. Tullidge, contemporary Utah historian, proclaimed him “Ogden’s most representative citizen.”

This is Utah Pioneers Trails and Landmarks Association historic marker #45, later adopted by the Sons of Utah Pioneers (#177 in that series). Erected June 25, 1937 and located at the Weber County Daughters of Utah Pioneers Museum at 2104 Lincoln Avenue in Ogden, Utah

In 2011, the above plaque was retrieved from its original location at the corner of 21st Street and Washington Boulevard, when the structure it was mounted on was demolished. That was the location of one of Lorin Farr’s early homes. The Farr descendants and the Ogden Pioneer Chapter of the Sons of Utah Pioneers remounted it here in 2013, with appreciation to the Daughters of Utah Pioneers for allowing its relocation to this site.

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