Brad’s House – Drive Me Crazy Filming Location

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This is where they filmed the scene where there was a party at Brad’s house in the movie Drive Me Crazy (1999).

It was filmed at the historic Antone Nielson Home in Draper, Utah.

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Antone Nielson Home

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The Antone Nielson Home

Built in 1898 by Antone Nielson, the granite rock for the foundation was brought from the temple quarry in Little Cottonwood Canyon.

The first floor was built 3 feet above the ground because of high ground water and possible flooding from the south willow creek.

This built is a Folk Victorian, 2 1/2″ story structure with a brick exterior. The intricate parquet wood floor was entirely hand cut and layed, then nailed in place. The remaining wood moldings were all carved from redwood.

Restored by Peter & Tatiana Lawson and Carl & Kim Clark from 1988-1993.

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Drive Me Crazy (1999)

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Drive Me Crazy (1999)

Another in my collection of filming locations for movies and TV shows.  Visit this page for more.

Filming locations I’ve come across for Drive Me Crazy (1999):

  • “Broad St” (25th St)
  • Brad’s House
  • The Centennial Dance
  • The Concert
  • The Diner
  • The Fight
  • The Gas Station
  • “Jefferson Park”
  • “Meteor Burger” (Kirt’s Drive Inn
  • The Mall
  • Nicole’s House
  • The Party
  • Provo River Falls
  • The School
  • The Left Banque
  • The Theater

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Jesse Knight

While exploring Utah Jesse Knight is a common name to come across, he was born in Nauvoo, Illinois in 1845 and became a weathly mining magnate in Utah.

He was one of the wealthiest, if not the wealthiest people in the Provo area for many years because of his great success in mining and business.

A great bio for Jesse is on this page.

Some of the places I’ve documented that are related to him are:

Granite Hydroelectric Power Plant Historic District

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At the mouth of Big Cottonwood Canyon is the Granite Hydroelectric Power Station, it was built in 1896 shortly after the Stairs Hydroelectric Power Plant just up the canyon from it.

It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1989.

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The Pump House

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This pump house has been a favorite for people who like ghost stories and haunted things in the area for as long as I can remember. A lot of websites call it the Benjamin Pump House even though I think it’s technically between Lake Shore and Palmyra.

These pump houses are for irrigation water and aren’t that uncommon, but the fact that so many kids talk about made me want to at least document it.

There are haunted places websites talking about a man getting caught in a machine and dying and another man trying to get him out and getting his arm caught and also dying. They also say there are unexplained lights and noises at night.

Another very common mix up for people is they go to the Larsen/Moran House and call it the pump house, it wasn’t a pump house, it was a residential home.

N.S. Nielson House

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The N.S. Nielson House, built in 1890, represents the economic prosperity enjoyed in Mt. Pleasant due to the successful Intermountain livestock industry. N.S. Nielson, born in Sweden in 1848, was a prominent local sheep rancher and businessman. The house is an outstanding example of eclectic architectural design in rural Utah.

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