Emmett “Bud” Wright

Tags

, , , ,

2018-09-04 11.48.43

Emmett “Bud” Wright

In 1920, Emmett “Bud” Wright made his living skiing, but not as a ski patrolman or ski racer. Bud worked as a lineman for the local telephone company, traveling the mountains surrounding Park City on his 10 foot-long, handmade skis, repairing the phone lines. When Bud broke one of his skis, he was forced to use skis of two different lengths because no ski shops existed in Park City.

Located on historic Park City Main Street in Park City, Utah.

2018-09-04 11.48.46

2018-09-04 11.48.50

 

“Ten O’Clock Whistle” and Old Public Library

Tags

, , , ,

2018-09-04 11.47.33

“Ten O’Clock Whistle” and Old Public Library

At 4:00 a.m. on June 19, 1898 a Chinese cook spotted flames on Main Street, and alerted a policeman who fired three pistol shots to awaken Parkites to the conflagration which destroyed virtually all the buildings on Main Street. Reconstruction of City Hall began almost immediately, and this three-story wood frame tower was added to house a more reliable fire alarm. A 1,500 pound bell was installed to alert the community to future fires. In 1905 the bell was replaced by an electric siren activated from the telephone company’s switchboard.

With the establishment of a reliable local fire department, the siren was used as a curfew warning for Park City’s young people, and became known as the “Ten O’clock Whistle.” Although the curfew had not been enforced for many years, the whistle continued to sound regularly until 1980.

The tower’s tall interior walls were used to hang fire hoses to dry. Otherwise empty, it became dilapidated. It was restored in 1983-84 as part of the City Hall restoration, and is now part of the Park City Museum.

The one-story brick commercial building adjacent to the tower was built just after the 1898 fire, on the remains of the two-story structure which burned down. Original occupants were a tailor and harness shop. A furniture store stood over the premises in 1907. In 1910 the Park City Public Library moved in, and remained here until 1982, when it relocated to the newly restored Miners Hospital in City Park. This building was restored in 1983-84, also a part of the City Hall restoration project. Owned by Park City Municipal Corporation, it has been leased out for commercial use.

The Bell Tower and Public Library Building are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Located on historic Park City Main Street in Park City, Utah.

2018-09-04 11.49.01

2018-09-04 11.49.09

2018-09-04 11.49.19

2018-09-04 11.49.23

City Hall

Tags

, , , ,

2018-09-04 11.47.49

City Hall

After several years of petitioning the State of Utah for incorporation, Park City was granted a charter on March 8, 1884. With a population in excess of 4,000 a building to centralize municipal functions was critically needed. Construction of City Hall began in 1885. The Great Fire of 1898 claimed all but the facade. Reconstruction began almost immediately, and in 1901 the tower and a 1,500 pound bell were added to warn Parkites of future conflagrations.

City Hall has housed diverse government offices. The old Utah Territorial Prison, commonly called ” The Dungeon” was located in the basement. Park City Municipal Corporation, needing larger quarters, vacated City Hall in 1983. Extensive restoration was completed in early 1984.

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, this is a two-story masonry and brick structure of the Victorian commercial style. Its decorative brick work, segmental arches over three bay openings on street level, and plat pilasters divided the upper level into a three-part composition make this one of the most distinctive structures built in Park City.

Located on historic Park City Main Street in Park City, Utah.

2018-09-04 11.49.342018-09-04 11.49.372018-09-04 11.49.482018-09-04 11.49.512018-09-04 11.49.55

Masonic Hall

Tags

, , , ,

2018-09-04 11.50.38

Masonic Hall

This building once served as the Masonic Hall for Uintah Lodge No. 7. Fraternal and secret societies flourished in Park City in the late 1900’s. Their meeting halls played a significant role in the town’s social fabric.

The Park City Masonic Association was organized in 1878, chartered in 1880, and met at various locations until this building was constructed in 1908 at a cost of $6,000. When the Masons became inactive the building went through a long period of abandonment or diverse uses.

The unusual arrangement and shape of windows were covered over with siding for many years, hiding these distinctive features. Old photographs were used as a guide to restoring the building to its original condition in 1983. This major restoration once again brought the three story, vernacular institutional style structure to its former place as a vital element of Park City’s commercial district.

Located on historic Park City Main Street in Park City, Utah.

2018-09-04 11.50.49

2018-09-04 11.50.55

Anderson Apartments

Tags

, , , ,

2018-09-04 11.41.19

Anderson Apartments

The north portion of this building was constructed in 1898 at a cost of $3,000.  It was the largest Main Street structure built after the 1898 fire which destroyed Park City’s commercial district.  The south section of the building was added around 1905.

The frame construction with rectangular gable roof and modified false front is a typical example of the vernacular commercial buildings of turn-of-the-century Park City.  The facade originally included a canopy and second floor balcony, as well as a different window configuration.

The building was originally occupied by E.D. Sutton & Co., which established a grocery and meat business in Park City in 1890.  Because the second floor was used as a meeting palce for the Masons and other social organizations, the building was called Social Hall.  The ground floor has been used by various commercial concerns in recent years, and also housed the Park City offices for Summit County services.  The upper floors have long been used as rental apartments.

Located on historic Park City Main Street in Park City, Utah.

2018-09-04 11.43.01

2018-09-04 11.43.04

2018-09-04 11.43.11

The Alamo

Tags

, , , ,

2018-09-04 11.40.53

The Alamo

Built in 1905 by the M.S. Aschiem Mercantile Company on property adjacent to its thriving, landmark store, this Mission style structure was one of the few brick commercial buildings on Main Street in its day.  The building has design features unique to Park City.  It is a Spanish Colonial revival design with decorative Queen Anne brickwork, and an interior ceiling composed of a series of barrel vaults.

Until 1911 the building was occupied by the Utah Independent Telephone Company, a rival exchange which eventually merged with Rocky Mountain Bell.  It subsequent changes of owners and uses, the building housed Utah Power & Light Company offices, a bowling alley and a liquor store, before establishing the Alamo Saloon existing today.  Careful restoration in 1981 presents a building whose facade today closely resembles  that of the building when constructed.

Located on historic Park City Main Street in Park City, Utah.

2018-09-04 11.42.26

2018-09-04 11.42.29

2018-09-04 11.42.34

The Club

Tags

, , , ,

2018-09-04 11.40.57

The Club

Built of wood after the great fire of 1898, this building has always functioned as a restaurant or saloon, and was originally called the Silver King Restaurant.  Construction took place in two phases: the southern half built first, and a mirror image of it added to the north several years later.  In 1907 the building shared the same wood porch with the two buildings to the north.

The interior walls are hung with a collection of animal trophies which have been looking down on the The Club’s patrons since longtime proprietor Heinie Hernan installed them in the 1930’s.  Moonshine was sold here during prohibition, and a memorable party occurred when President Roosevelt legalized alcoholic beverages in 1932.  This is the only saloon from Park City’s mining heyday whose interior remains substantially unchanged.

Although fairly typical of other commercial facades built along Main Street in its day, The Club is distinguished by its ornate wood cornice and bracketed wood lintels above the two double hung windows.  Its recessed entry and two story height are consistent with most commercial structures built in Park City at the turn of the century.

Located on historic Park City Main Street in Park City, Utah.

2018-09-04 11.42.41

2018-09-04 11.42.44

2018-09-04 11.42.52

War Veterans Memorial Building

Tags

, , , , ,

2018-09-04 11.40.22

War Veterans Memorial Building

In 1919 Park City’s newly-organized American Legion proposed to build a meeting hall in honor of Summit County’s World War I veterans.  Plans were drawn up, but had to be tabled when funding could not be found.  The project was reactivated in the mid-1930s when Summit County commissioners purchased this site, and approved a tax assessment of one mill to be allocated for the building.  Additionally, grant monies were obtained from the Work Progress Administration.  Park City civic leader Ed McPolin was instrumental in obtaining county support for this endeavor.

The cornerstone of the War Veterans Memorial Building  was laid in April, 1939; by January 1940 the building was completed and dedicated.  The structure’s design represents the Art Deco Style popular from 1925 to 1940.  Art Deco floral relief sculpture is featured on the central portion of the front facade, and is typical of the hard-edged relief ornamentation found around door and window openings of this building style.  The stopped, set back facade is also characteristic of the Art Deco style.

With its auditorium, lounge, kitchen and dining room, bowling alley, pool and game rooms, and meeting rooms, the building became  a significant part of Park City’s recreation and culture life.  Most recently the building has been headquarters for the Park City Recreation Department, and was base for community radio station KPCW until late 1984.  The Park City City Council held meetings here until 1982, and the building still provides facilities for nonprofit  and civic organizations.  It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Located on historic Park City Main Street in Park City, Utah.

2018-09-04 11.42.01

2018-09-04 11.42.02

2018-09-04 11.42.13

Rocky Mountain Bell Telephone Office

Tags

, , , ,

2018-09-04 11.38.59

Rocky Mountain Bell Telephone Office

This two-story structure was designed by Richard Kletting, who at the turn of the century was considered Utah’s foremost architect.  Attesting to the company’s confidence in Park City’s future, Rocky Mountain Bell Telephone purchased the land in July, 1898, only a month after the devastating fire which destroyed most of the Main Street commercial district.  The building, completed later that year, was used as an office to serve the company’s local clientele, and when Mountain States Telephone and Telegraph Company purchased Rocky Mountain Bell in 1911, the building was retained  for the same purpose.

In 1964 the building was sold.  Since that time it has housed a real estate office, clothing store and, currently, a restaurant.  The second floor has generally been used for living quarters.

The structure played a significant role in developing communication in this burgeoning mining town.  It has had only minor  alterations since it was built, and is typical of the Victorian commercial buildings constructed in its time.

Located on historic Park City Main Street in Park City, Utah.

2018-09-04 11.39.46